Acquired Stuttering in Veterans of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: The Role of Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Medications

The primary aim in this study was to determine the association between acquired stuttering (AS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and
post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a cohort of 309,675 U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. The secondary aim was to determine the association between AS and medication patterns for veterans in the sample. Two hundred thirty-five veterans were diagnosed with AS in the cohort. There was the greater likelihood of an AS diagnosis for veterans with concomitant TBI and PTSD when compared with veterans without these diagnoses. Over 66% of those with stuttering were prescribed at least one medication that affected speech fluency (antidepressants, anxiolytics, and antiepileptic drugs) compared with 35% of those without AS. Veterans with a comorbid diagnosis of TBI and PTSD were more likely to be diagnosed with AS and more likely to have been prescribed medications known to affect speech production.

Norman, Ricio, Jaramillo, Carlos, Eapen, Blessen, Amuan, Megan E., and Puch, Mary Jo. (2018). Acquired Stuttering in Veterans of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: The Role of Traumatic Brain Injury,
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Medications. Military Medicine https://doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usy067

About rickyWburk

Ricky W. Burk, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, is a speech-language pathologist who provides in-home therapy for adolescents and adults residing in Tennessee and Mississippi who stutter. His career includes PreK, elementary, middle, and high school practice, undergraduate & graduate faculty appointments, skilled nursing, national & international consultation, private practice, and national & international speaking presentations. He holds the American Speech-Language Hearing Association Certificate of Clinical Competence, and he is a Board Certified Specialist in Fluency Disorders. He is the ASHA Continuing Education Administrator for the National Association for Speech Fluency.
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